Category Archives: Tour US

Summer in Alaska 4


One of the Alaska photo-clichés: the bay, the sea mark, the seagull, the fishing boat and the snow-covered mountains on the background.


Still life of a fishing stead. Nets for fish, cages for crab.


Salmon fever during the tide in the Kachemak Bay.


Nikolaevsk Road leading to the Nikolsky Church in the Russian village of Nikolaevsk.

Summer in Alaska 3

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The inglorious end of the northern sea veteran from the ’70s, the times when fishing was the main trade in Alaska.

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Housesitters

Say, you wanted to live in silence and seclusion, far beyond the city, in the valley of wonderful mountains.

So, you bought a plot of land on the mountainside, brought the machinery up the winding serpentine and built a nice house.

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Summer in Alaska 2


Starved in the winter and spring young elk is feeding on our strawberries.


Tourists are trying to familiarize with the harsh history of the legendary north.


Alaska has the highest percentage of pilots per capita, but this overcast summer they are in the sky less often.

Summer in Alaska 1

“Summer in Alaska” are, of course, big words. We have not yet seen the summer, because the spring is till strolling through July’s yard.

The returned from sunny California ducks are too in somewhat bewilderment: it’s too cool for the ducklings.

No, of course, we also get some sun, but in its special northern entourage.

But only if most of May in Anchorage it was like this …

… then all June and, it seems, July we are awaited by something like this.

One consolation: on cloudy days the most beautiful colors appear in the photographs. And we will have a lot of them. Photos.

Cause after a long break, we’re back 🙂

Spring in Alaska


Its own unique spring in Anchorage at the end of March.


Most likely this is the last opportunity for Tosha to play in the snow this season.

Amook Bay

Yesterday Rus returned from the bear camp. True, the bear is now resting, but as for wilderness, remoteness and solitude – always welcome.

The grey ghost replaced the car.

The neighbor, Jim, who lives about a mile south and comes to pick up the mail, replaced a live human communication, even if it’s just for half an hour every Tuesday.

This fawn played the role of the indigenous animal. From hunger and weakness it separated from its parents and came to human dwelling to die (he’s still alive).

And this aggregate delivered mail and groceries once a week.

This is the Kodiak Island, baby!